Global Warning Indicator

The World's first downloadable
local weather forecast station

The ‘Global Warning Indicator' is the world's first downloadable weather station. It has been specifically designed for children to record their local weather and then share that information with fellow enthusiasts around the country, to produce real time weather predictions that (I argue) are more accurate than those currently being offered by the Met Office (with it’s £33 million supercomputer, 1500 staff and an operating budget of £170 million and it’s all done by simple observation and the accurate recording of data.

This low tech, scientific instrument takes full advantage of 3D printing technology, as there is no stock left languishing on a shelf (it doesn’t exist until you’ve placed an order). It’s 100% green credentials are that it’s made from biodegradable polyamide plastic and as such will have a minimal negative impact on our planet (there’s no need for a box, unless you want to print one yourself).

Music ('The Final Countdown' and 'Imperial March' from Star Wars by: 'The Floppotron'

I designed my ‘Global Warning Indicator’ in Adobe Illustrator, as a way to get children thinking about ‘Climate Change’.

2. Personalise GWI by adding your own descriptions. If the stones: Jumps- earthquake, Has a shadow - sunny, Gone - stolen etc.

3. Through Bob Lindsley’s Kingston Round Table of Inventors, I met American author of ‘Ideas to Invention’, Patricia Nolan-Brown.

4. I sent my 2D drawings off to Patricia in Massachusett, where she converted them (using CAD software) into a 3D code.

5. I then took her code to Jim McLernon who runs ‘iMakr Store’, a 3D Printers in Clerkenwell, London.

6. iMakr use MakerBot 3D Printers which creates physical objects from biodegradable PLA plastic (made of corn).

7. At iMarkr they have a bank of MarkerBot Replicators, that can reproduce objects up to the size of a loaf of bread.

8. Bob (my cameraman) filmed the GWI being made on a GoPro (slow motion) camera. The sequence took four hours to complete.

9. Whilst we were waiting, we occupied our time playing with 3D printed film props and making a general nusence of ourselves.

10. 3D printing is a process that creates an object by laying down successive layers of material from the bottom up (see film above).

11. This was a second snapshot half way through printing (roughly two hours), as you can see it’s half way made.

12. This was a third snapshot at the three quarters stage and well on the way to completion now.

13. Final shot (four hours later). The yellow background denotes that the printing process is completed and ‘hey presto’ - a 3D product.

14. After completion the product in this case a Global Warning Indicator is scraped off the base plate and cleaned up of loose ends.

15. The GWI is then assembled and glued on a bench to complete the product.

16. The next stage was to design the packaging to present the product in. If required.

17. I then took the artwork to Ash Raithatha who manages my local my local Prontaprint (you can download the file from our link).

18. When I got home I glued the sheets to a box I had already made earlier.

19. Why not experiment with other kinds of packaging, this one was designed to hang from a hook in a shop.

20. Took the GWI to Rees Calder at ‘My Mini Factory’ (a London based social media platform that promotes 3D printable objects).

21. Print off Edition 1 of Planet Reed, or better still design your own newspaper and publish it on-line edition (see Prontaprint link again).

22. So. Climate Change: Is it a load of hot air, or are we skaiting on thin ice? Get the ‘GWI’ and find out for yourself.

23. And their you have it the worlds first downloadable ‘Global Warning Indicator’.

Features:
a) Indicates sunshine, rain or snow (just by looking at it)
b) Low tech
c) Low carbon footprint
d) For indoors or outdoors
e) Maintence free.

Get involved:
1) Join up with other schools/people who take daily readings
2) Having bought your GWI, why not design your own packaging, using our template and upload it onto  our site, for others to enjoy and use?
3) Why not download our designs and make your own packaging, better still use our templates and  design your own?

The Global Warning Indicator’s primary aim is to:
a) Get children interested in studying the weather
b) Contribute to the global warming/freezing debate
c) Get them involved in 'Green Issues' from an early age.


It works like this:

1) Buy the GWI from iMaker 3D Printers and it will be dispatched to you within  24 hours.
2) On receipt, self assemble GWI (http://planetreed.london/?page_id=145)
3) Download the packaging from Prontoprint (or design your own).
4) Record the weather and upload data to our national ‘Cordani Coordinates’ climate software
5) Team up with fellow enthusiasts and schools and share information. The more people that plot and  calculate the weather more accurate your predictions will be.

But, why depend on my 'Global Warning Indicator' to predict the weather in the first place, when old wive’s tails (which use nature) have been doing a pretty good job of doing just that for hundreds of years are known to be 100% accurate.

We all know a ‘Red sky at night, shepherd’d delight: means that ‘fair weather is headed towards you’ and that ‘red sky in the morning shepherd’s warning’ means, prepare for a wet and windy day. Other weather proverbs are ‘A ring around the sun or moon’ means rain or snow is on it’s way and when a pine cone closes up, then it’s about to rain. ‘When swallows fly high it will be dry’, ‘cows lie down when it’s about to rain’ and (assuming you buy British onions) then ‘the thicker the outer skin the harder the winter to come’. For more information go to: http://www.weatherwithouttechnology.co.uk/index.html



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